What's your alternative OS of choice?

Questions and comments about living in Japan, chit-chat, or whatever else goes in here.

Moderator: Gaijin Punch

Greatsaintlouis
Outta My Way
Outta My Way
Posts: 985
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2004 4:16 am
Location: The Angry Dome

What's your alternative OS of choice?

Postby Greatsaintlouis » Tue Oct 26, 2010 2:55 am

Starting up a new job that involves a lot of repetitive file manipulation, the sort of stuff that could possibly be automated/done better with a little scripting know-how or by writing a few basic programs. I'm dumb as a brick when it comes to coding, but I figure it still wouldn't hurt to see if I can't pick up the basics of a non-Windows/Mac OS in my free time and see what I can do with it. I've got a spare laptop that makes an excellent testbed, so...

What sort of alternative OS do you use? Some Linux distro? A BSD variant? Something more obscure, maybe--are you rocking the Haiku Alpha? Still have that BeBox up and running? ENIAC more your speed?

What do you use it for--are you a sysadmin? Web hosting? Windows not allowed in your house? Is Nethack really the best game ever? Here's your chance to tell all.
You also distaste me with passion!

User avatar
Gaijin Punch
Supreme Leader
Supreme Leader
Posts: 8046
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 9:02 am
Location: in da house

Postby Gaijin Punch » Wed Oct 27, 2010 3:24 am

I would install Ubuntu (even though I don't like it) and learn Perl. There's a couple of modules like File::Copy and something like File::Tree (I know that's not right, but it's similar) that will help.

Perl take s a bit to wrap your head around, as it has goofy ways of naming some variables and it really does suck at some things (OOP, for example) but it's main purpose in life is for dicking around with files.
Rade wrote:Finally received a reply by posting in a thread at that Gaijin forum:

Greatsaintlouis
Outta My Way
Outta My Way
Posts: 985
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2004 4:16 am
Location: The Angry Dome

Postby Greatsaintlouis » Wed Oct 27, 2010 4:07 am

Thanks for that. I've tried to stay away from Ubuntu just because it seems a lot like "Linux-lite" with all the effort the distro puts into keeping people away from Linux's gritty underbelly; is it better to start out with something like that to ease one's way in?
You also distaste me with passion!

User avatar
Gaijin Punch
Supreme Leader
Supreme Leader
Posts: 8046
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 9:02 am
Location: in da house

Postby Gaijin Punch » Wed Oct 27, 2010 10:19 am

Well, that seems to be the trend now. Redhat is even worse. Ubuntu is still a terminal-friendly distro, and the package manager is very similar to gentoo's. I don't use much else, and i only use Ubuntu b/c a few machines in the office have it. But, if I was really more worried about needing to get stuff done (which it seems you do) I'd spend 80% of the time learning Perl or some other scripting language.

Stay away from Gentoo. It's for assholes like me.
Rade wrote:Finally received a reply by posting in a thread at that Gaijin forum:

User avatar
lordnikon
Past The Newbie Stage
Past The Newbie Stage
Posts: 201
Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 1:41 am
Location: Chicago

Postby lordnikon » Fri Nov 19, 2010 3:01 am

For a Linux distro, I prefer Slackware. ;) It gives you a ton of control, and doesn't hold your hand. It provides plenty of documentation to read, but it expects that you actually read it. I am actually a graphic designer, and have been getting sick and tired of the bloat in professional software like Photoshop (you actually have to have a minimum 256mb graphics card and have to enable openGL support now to get a clean frame draw.. fucking NUTS). Apps like Inkscape and Blender are now prograde (if only GIMP would catch up a bit). Plus there is a ton of stuff going on out there in the audio scene with the likes of LMMS and others.

The thing is, I also like my OS to be fine tuned and efficient, and also as a designer, I like to have a clean simple intuitive interface. Going with Linux affords me this control, but going with Slack affords me even more. It is one of the most "unixy" of the Linux distros.

My goal is to build an entirely open source creative development box for coding, graphics, and audio.

One route to take is to try stuff out in VMware, then then take the final plunge when you know what you want to use.

User avatar
Gaijin Punch
Supreme Leader
Supreme Leader
Posts: 8046
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 9:02 am
Location: in da house

Postby Gaijin Punch » Fri Nov 19, 2010 3:59 am

You're right about the bloat in the "professional" software. Mainly since they're not open source, they're feature-driven, not performance driven (unfortunately). I'm on CS3 I think of PHotoshop and use it for pretty basic shit (what you see on the site). However, all the scans and stitching them together when needed is done on my Linux box. Mainly gimp and a closed-source, multi-platform program for automatically stitching. It was like 90 Euros and totally worth it.

Things aren't nearly as peachy in the audio world I've found though. Most professional loooking thing is Audacity which is good for some stuff (although I have codec issues on my box sometimes). Music production like Reason, Live, Cubase... I don't think we're going to see a Linux solution for such things for years (if ever).

I'll check on Inkscape & Blender. Are either Illustrator alternatives?
Rade wrote:Finally received a reply by posting in a thread at that Gaijin forum:

Greatsaintlouis
Outta My Way
Outta My Way
Posts: 985
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2004 4:16 am
Location: The Angry Dome

Postby Greatsaintlouis » Fri Nov 19, 2010 6:20 am

Blender is 3d modelling program, but Inkscape is a vector graphics editor. I'm not sure how it compares to Illustrator, feature-wise, though.

And goddamn. I've been using Gimp on Windows since before that version was concurrent with the latest Linux release, and I have to say, if it's not yet pro-grade then I obviously have no concept of what sort of tools a real graphic designer needs. I bounce back and forth between my Gimp setup and CS2 (maybe CS3?) on the server at work for some minor image editing and really can't find any differences, feature-wise. Now as far as what menus or icons the features are hidden under, that's another matter.

lordnikon> Glad to hear of your fondness for Slackware. It always looked like one of the better roads to take if one really wanted to get into the innards of customizing a Linux distro, but that also made it seem very daunting as well. I might give it a try nonetheless, having finally heard of a real human who's used it. The "infinite control" is definitely the alluring part. Thanks for the VMware tip; I've got that or VirtualBox installed on the laptop (which supports hardware virtualization unlike my poor desktop), and that should make for a very painless, if slow, means of testing out different options.

EDIT: Goddammit, the Wikipedia article on Slackware mentions that its package management system doesn't keep track of dependencies, which is complete bullshit in this day and age. I remember going through that nonsense nine years ago with Red Hat 7 and Mandake 8, and it was a nightmare searching the ends of the Internet on dialup for some library that an installer complained about, only to discover through some obscure forum post that the missing library was part of a library package with a completely different name. I'm all for learning how to be more hands-on with my computing, but that doesn't mean I want to go back to goddamn punch cards, either. Christ, it's like the guy behind Slackware just forgot to bring the entire package management section of the OS with him when he left the year 2001.
You also distaste me with passion!

User avatar
lordnikon
Past The Newbie Stage
Past The Newbie Stage
Posts: 201
Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 1:41 am
Location: Chicago

Postby lordnikon » Sat Nov 20, 2010 7:51 am

Gaijin Punch wrote:Things aren't nearly as peachy in the audio world I've found though. Most professional loooking thing is Audacity which is good for some stuff (although I have codec issues on my box sometimes). Music production like Reason, Live, Cubase... I don't think we're going to see a Linux solution for such things for years (if ever).

Have you checked out LMMS? Due to it being oss, it does have odd interface discrepancies and some crash bugs... but I played around with it and started making some tracks and found I can make just as professional stuff with it as I can in cubase. If you take LMMS and then start finding other freely available VST's... you can do a lot with it. Obviously pro-grade paid software is going to be better, but if all I had was LMMS, I could definatly make it work.

Gaijin Punch wrote:I'll check on Inkscape & Blender. Are either Illustrator alternatives?

Inkscape is a direct replacement for Illustrator. I hate Illustrator because its application layout is like photoshop which makes ZERO sense for a vector graphics application. I have always preferred CorelDRAW to illustrator, and Inkscapes interface is very much like DRAW's. Put it this way... at work, I use Inkscape as a complete replacement for Illustrator.

Blender is for 3D, and I would consider it a direct competator to 3D Studio Max or Maya. Here is just an example of how professional you can make something:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUY-GO_FjJM

I personally hate stuff like this, but, it does show how far you can push the software.

Greatsaintlouis wrote:EDIT: Goddammit, the Wikipedia article on Slackware mentions that its package management system doesn't keep track of dependencies, which is complete bullshit in this day and age...

As it states in the slackbook:
"Dependency management is left up to the sysadmin, and that's the way we like it."

So there is actual intent with this, rather than lazyness.

This just gets back into the whole thing about giving the admin complete control over the OS. There are actually situations where dependency checking can be a problem, and a whole bunch of stuff gets installed to the OS that is unecessary.

Slackware is a hardcore linux OS. Its either for existing hardcore linux users, or those that are looking to start understanding Linux at a finite level. This is where I am at right now. I am not an experienced Linux user, but due to the direction Windows/Mac are going, and also where Ubuntu is headed (recently dropped X.org for Wayland)... I am sick and tired of the OS environment being stripped of any complexity to appease the ignorant masses.


Return to “Everything Else”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron